Texas, Day 7, Part 2: Blucher Park

Corpus Christi has made a concerted effort to preserve the semi-tropical forest in its midst, thanks largely to George Blucher.  He was a son of Felix von Blucher, an early settler of the Corpus Christi area, and with his siblings, managed his father’s ranch and coastal properties, until his own passing in 1929.  His house is still maintained as a Bed and Breakfast and is registered with the Texas Historical Commission.

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The park is across the street from the B & B.  I post these photos, without further comment, so that you get a sense of the serenity, even in the midst of a busy neighbourhood.

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After this delightful walk, I headed south on US 77, towards the Rio Grande Valley.  Along the way, I passed through the countryside that was home to John G. Kenedy, the benefactor to Corpus Christi’s Catholic diocese.  His ranch is a Texas Historic Site, near Falfurrias.

Here is a glimpse of the area.  It’s known as the Wild Horse Desert.

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Next-  Day 7, Part 3:  South Padre Island Intro.

6 thoughts on “Texas, Day 7, Part 2: Blucher Park

  1. Nice… always admired your wonderful walks and the photos that you share with us from these walks 😀 These are beautiful… love the plantation house architecture of the b&b 🙂

    Like

  2. Pingback: Bird Watching Opportunities in Upper Padre

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