The Road to 65, Mile 235: Back to California, Day 5, Part 2- Point Mugu to Ojai

July 21, 2015, Ojai-  I was determined to arrive in Ojai, and to find a fairly inexpensive place in which to spend the night.  That meant bypassing Mission San Buenaventura, in- you guessed it, Ventura.  This seaside namesake of the LA area’s northern county, and its sister city, Oxnard, were full-up congested, as I passed through.  At one point, with a Ventura police officer behind me in traffic, a boy of about nine started to walk nonchalantly into traffic, with his little sister in tow.  He froze when he saw me, but I stopped, halfway through the intersection, and waved them on through.  The cop followed me for about 1 1/2 blocks, then determined I was of sound mind, and went on his way.  Crosswalks are there to be used.

Before that, though, I happened through an area not high on a lot of people’s to visit list: Point Mugu.  It used to be a major naval station, though it, and nearby Port Hueneme, have been downsized.  The rock, though, did attract about a dozen bathers and sun-worshippers.

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This rock, south of the signature Point, was partly occupied by three off-duty sailors, who declined to be photographed.  So, I made do with the western edge.

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The drive to Ojai, once through the Ventura County beach towns, was serene and lovely.  I chose Oakridge Inn, in Oak View, as my resting place for the night.  It is close enough to Ojai, for a quick jaunt to that mountain town, and near to the junction which leads to Carpinteria and Santa Barbara.

Ojai has just the right mix of generations and balance of artistic and business-oriented people.  It’s also one of the cleanest towns I’ve seen in southern California. The downtown mall is a mix of Spanish and Old West influences.

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The Post Office has an Andalusian ambiance.

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This is the courtyard behind Feast Bistro.  Many people use this area to walk their dogs in the evening.  It reminds me of some shopping minmalls in the town of Sedona, near Prescott.

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This fountain has been turned off, due to California’s paltry water supply.

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Here is another class act: Feast Bistro.  It’s a local favourite, and everyone there that night seemed to be a regular.  Dogs are welcome on the patio, and are given water bowls, so long as they are leashed and well-behaved.

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It’s no wonder my West LA friend, Kate, recommended Ojai so highly.

4 thoughts on “The Road to 65, Mile 235: Back to California, Day 5, Part 2- Point Mugu to Ojai

  1. Good you avoided disaster — but I’m sure the cop wanted to stop you for a good driver award — sidewalks are there for a reason, but a pedestrian always has the right of way!
    The rock has changed so much over the years — you used to be able to drive around it! The really fun place is just a little farther south — in your 4th & 5th shots, there is a sandy hill just before the end of the rocks on the left side of the photo — people stop there, climb to the top, and slide down the hill!
    Ojai is a quaint little town with a lot going for it. It’s definitely an artists’ community, but also well known in the area for its focus on tennis — just across from the post office is a lovely park through the arch in the next to last shot — they have many art-focused activities there, and sufficient tennis courts to have an annual regional tournament The mountains behind Ojai are also home to the California Condor, which is being reintroduced by the SD Zoo.

  2. I seem to recall several references to the California Condor. The next phase of my travels, over the ensuing five years, will be to go to one or two areas, and spend a minimum of a week in each. Probably, the month of June will be devoted to that sort of endeavour. The rest of the time, I will be working, volunteering or visiting family (during the holidays).

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