No One Should Be Pushed Along

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January 8, 2020, Sedona-SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

 

I can remember, when I stood in front of Mona Lisa, in case and air conditioned room, in the Louvre.  All manner of frenetic tourists were jockeying for position around me,  not rushing me-but bickering with one another, in a variety of  tongues.  All this, for a few seconds per person, to take a self-portrait with the Lady of Mystery.  I did not take a selfie, but was content to have her countenance recorded in my photo album of France’s premier art institution.  I needed ten seconds.

I think of this, when waiting for fellow hikers or other visitors to complete their time at a an overlook or striking scene.  Each of us has the same right as anyone else, to enjoy wonders great and small.  No one who might be impatiently toe-tapping, while waiting for the people in front of them to be done and move on, can know just how important these small moments in the midst of grandeur might turn out to be for the seeming dawdlers.

My little family and I waited, atop Submarine Rock, at the end of Little Horse Trail, while the people in front of us, finished taking photographs, and taking in the astonishing view.  This took about five minutes, and was, as often happens in my experience, followed by one of the men offering to take photos of the three of us atop the rock.  My daughter-in-law then took more shots of the men, from another vantage point.

This is one way that friends are made, and everyone’s enjoyment of a wondrous tableau is enhanced.  How much more pleasant would the afternoon been, for the tourists in Chez Mona Lisa, had there been a bit more camaraderie!  I may be dreaming, but that is my wont.

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An Eastward Homage, Day 9: Le Musee de Louvre, Part III- La Joconde and Other Treasures

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June 4, 2014- The Section Denon, which contains many of the Renaissance paintings in the Louvre’s treasury, is entered via the Hall of Queen Anna.  An informational sign tells the origins of the Louvre as a public museum.

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Next, note the ceiling.  The ceilings throughout this lead-in to Cour Corree (Square Salon) are done up like those in a palace, or grand cathedral.

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The hall has a series of ceiling panels, all in high ornate gold.

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We will see the Coronation of Napoleon, as well as the treasures of Chambre de La Joconde (The Mona Lisa Room).  First, though, I wish to share some of the items in the Great Hall of Louis XIV.  Many fine crystal and lapis lazuli pieces have been brought here from Versailles.

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The Two Crowns, those of Louis XIV and of Louis XV, are shown in this case.

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In the subsequent galleries, the aforementioned Chambre La Joconde and Salon de Coronissement, are found several of the paintings for which people visit the museum.

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I will start with Veronese’s  “The Wedding at Cana”.

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This, and “The Coronation of the Virgin in Paradise”, by Tintoretto, are actually far more  prominent in the gallery itself.

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Giotto’s “Madonna and Child ” complements Veronese’s masterpiece.

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Leonardo da Vinci’s “Madonna and Child with Ste.Anne” follows his predecessor’s depiction.

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On the opposite wall is the Other Lady.  I was actually fortunate to get this close.

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We left this sanctified room after fifteen minutes, and spent time with France’s two most active militarist rulers.  First is Francois I, a contemporary of Henry VIII.

 

 

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Then there is the Emperor, at his coronation.  Jacques-Louis David’s masterpiece is the center of Salon de Coronissement.

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After the guided tour ended, I found Salon de Verres, and these Biblical gems.  First is “The Fainting of Esther”, by Veronese, showing the Jewish Queen swooning at the prospect of her marriage to Xerxes.

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The ceiling fresco, “The Banishment of Lucifer” graces Salon de Verres as well.

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With this brief visit to Salon de Verres, I thought I was ready for the east segment of the Left Bank.  The Universe had other plans, and as the rain was getting heavier after lunch, I visited L’Eglise St. Germain d’Auxerres and then went back to my hotel for a bit.  This was nonetheless a fantastic introduction to one of the world’s true treasure houses.

NEXT:  A Visit to Trocadero, and ‘Abdu’l-Baha’s Apartment

 

It’s Chalk Time!

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This weekend, Prescott hosted the annual Chalk It Up Art Festival.  I first attended this enthralling event, two years ago, and found this year’s version even more fascinating than that of 2012.  Kids of all ages put some amazing images together, such as the one which heads my previous post, “The Others”.

Here are nineteen of the images.

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This next piece was photographed while the artist was present.  She was delighted that I shot the full rectangular outline, without prompting.  Others had taken shots from a trapezoidal angle, which bothered her.

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That’s a matter of judgment.  Whatever colours your eyes and heart bring into your life though, the message is clear:

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