From Home to Home and Back, Day 7: A Princeton Morning

I always enjoy a visit to a large college or university campus.  Harvard, the University of San Diego and the University of Texas at Austin are among those I’ve visited in the past few years, besides those of Arizona’s state  university system.

So, it was with great pleasure that I accepted an invitation from fellow blogger Jeff Markowitz (The Chalk Outline) to visit the early 18th Century splendours of Princeton University, on the morning of August 30.

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We began, of course, with breakfast, at the venerable PJ’s Pancake House.SAM_6507

Once nourished, and filled with coffee, we set out, through Princeton’s bustling downtown.

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As with any great campus, a tour of Princeton begins at the main administrative hall.

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We were able  to look around the central hall, and then headed for Princeton’s large and venerable Chapel.

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Princeton’s north campus contains most of the major academic halls, such as the Sciences Complex.

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We came next to the Literature Building.SAM_6523

Our next stop was the central garden area.

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Our jaunt through the south part of campus took us past the dormitories, many of which are turreted, as well as the gymnasium and a hockey rink.

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Here, upon returning to the north side of the University, we encountered the statue of Princeton’s founder, John Witherspoon.

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As I have been told by some kind people that I can still turn heads, and since Windows XP will not allow the rotation of photographs, I will now put the first notion to the test.

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We returned to the town, after these photos were taken by a foreign student, and enjoyed a cool beverage, at Panera Bread, before visiting the historical cemetery, where Aaron Burr,  Jonathan Edwards (the fire and brimstone preacher, not the singer from the 1970’s) and pollster George Gallup, among others, are buried.  My camera battery ran out of juice before I could get shots of those graves, but not before I took a photo of the Robeson Center.  Paul Robeson was closely tied to Princeton, especially in his later years.

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Jeff is a most gracious and engaging guide.  He has photos of this excursion on his own WP site, The Chalk Outline.  I  encourage those interested in his genre, Crime Fiction, to visit the site and read his interesting works.

As it happened, I ended Day 7 at my brother’s house in Saugus, MA.  It is from here that the next several posts will emanate.

16 thoughts on “From Home to Home and Back, Day 7: A Princeton Morning

  1. I think this is one of my favorite posts. As much as I love nature and hearing of people’s spiritual journeys, I absolutely love old college campuses. Gah..to be ensconced in one of those buildings while pursuing knowledge…who could ask for anything more?

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  2. Awesome! The campus and the buildings reminded me of Greenwich in London. I love checking out places like that. You’re funny, Gary! Yup, I had to turn my head to look at the pictures of you, LOL. Looking good, my friend! I am enjoying your posts. I look forward to the next one! 🙂

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  3. What wonderful architecture there! I especially love that chapel door. Interesting about that carving of the one winged angel with the woman atop it. There’s a one-winged angel angel character in an anime I can just vaguely remember. I think his name was Sepiroth and he was a little… well, not precisely good. I barely remember though. What is the story with the one above the chapel door and the woman who’s with him? Do you know?

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