The Road to 65, Mile 180: Two Gardens, Two Riverwalks- Part 1

May 27, 2015, Reno- The sodden ground of Texas has been much on my mind, in this strange, beautiful and terrible end of May.  The Red Cross has issued a call for volunteers, both general and specific.  Once again, here I am, far afield from the disaster area, wrestling with a measure of guilt and facing my own challenge.  Such is the cost of marching to one’s own drumbeat.  There will come a time, again, when I will find myself in a disaster area, and will be all-in with the recovery work.  For now, that work falls to others.

So, on I go- being here, in The Biggest Little City in the World, for some people who I have known, seemingly forever, and they for me.  It will take another day or so for my vehicle to be refitted; then I will take my leave.  I hope that, in some way, I will have refitted my friends to address their individual pain-fields, and to be more equipped to cast that pain aside.

Most cities have at least one public garden, where flora of all kinds are celebrated and allowed to flourish.   One of Reno’s is the Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Garden, named in honour of a local philanthropist and rancher, who was a scion of the May Department Store’s founder. It is part of the larger  Rancho San Rafael Regional Park. Our visit there, yesterday, took place under partly cloudy skies, in comfortable conditions. Here are a few scenes.

The Duck Pond had two intrepid mallards in it.  The often ubiquitous Canadian geese were nowhere to be seen.  It being a strange year, that is somehow not surprising.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

After stopping by the Visitor’s Center, and confirming as to the reason for the dearth of waterfowl, we continued to the Arboretum and Botanical Garden, proper. St. Patrick’s Grove greets the visitor, and extends along the sidewalk.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The stone shamrock reflects, with its cracks, the experience of  Ireland.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The Labyrinth Garden is small, and mainly features ground cover, around the intriguing maze-like circle.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Passing into the Arboretum, we came first to the Kleiner Grove, featuring oaks of the East Coast.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

                                   A small area is set aside, in honour of Wilbur May’s mother.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

                                   The bridge, and adjacent waterfalls, express Mrs. May’s tastes.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

            This waterfall was available for photographing.  The other was the focus of another patron’s deep meditation.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

This abandoned water slide lies just east of the park.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The Songbird Garden was rather quiet, but then, it was mid-afternoon.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

These fountain stones evoked Carnac, for me.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Light and shadow have a reassuring effect.

While finishing up our visit, I thought of Blucher Park, Corpus Christi’s downtown nature walk, which feature’s that area’s native plants.  It was lovely, this time of year, in 2012.  I wonder about its condition now, after the tribulations of last weekend.  Corpus saw its record for wettest month broken, this past weekend.  It apparently did not suffer as much as places further north and east, but the pain is there, and the community lost one of its own, in floodwaters near the town of Uvalde, west of San Antonio.

We continued on, this afternoon, to Reno’s Riverwalk and downtown.  More about these, in Part 2.

5 thoughts on “The Road to 65, Mile 180: Two Gardens, Two Riverwalks- Part 1

  1. It’s many years since I’ve been in Reno — and probably never to this exact spot — but I remember the city as a beautiful oasis on the edge between mountains and desert. I’m glad you are in such a nice place while your car is repaired! There’s no shame in being in a location other than where the current disaster has occurred — one cannot single-handedly solve all disasters for all friends. I hope, though, that the car is fixed quickly now, and that you can continue on with your planned trip!

    • There have been moments, this past week, when I have felt indeed as if being on several edges, at once. I will allude more to this theme, in my next two posts. It occurs to me, as well, that apologizing for not being here or there is a bit of a conceit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s