A Capitol’s Quiet Hour

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June 30, 2019, Raleigh-

Perhaps in a moment of selfishness, I chose to head to North Carolina’s Triad region, specifically to the Capitol, rather than to the west central area, north of Charlotte.  This, though, is what my spirit guides were telling me was in order.

I found Raleigh in a quiet and pensive collective mood, whilst walking about the Capitol District on this morning, when many were engaged in acts of worship.  I pretty much had the area to myself.

The great museums would not open until noon, by which time I was getting my laundry done, in south Raleigh’s International Market, a haven for the area’s Hispanic community.

Part of the Tar Heel story is told on the Museum of History’s grounds.  The frame of a Catawba home is here, surrounded by the lushness of the Piedmont.

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North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences takes up the right flank of the Museum Quarter.

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The North Carolina Museum of History occupies the left hand side.

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Three figures greet the visitor to the Museum of History: A woman of Sauratown, Thomas Day and Frederick Augustus Olds.  Sauratown is an isolated mountain region, northwest of Winston-Salem.  The independence of area residents is commemorated by this statue of an unidentified woman.  Thomas Day is celebrated as an example of how much a free Black man could achieve.  He was a skilled cabinetmaker, of the Antebellum period. Frederick Augustus Olds, a journalist, was a relentless advocate of telling North Carolina’s story, especally of “human history” and of the advancement of both Boy and Girl Scouts.

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Here is the Promenade, in its fullness.

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North Carolina is the birthplace of three U.S. Presidents:  Andrew Jackson, James Knox Polk and Andrew Johnson.  They may not be the favourites of many people, but each pursued and achieved his goals.  The State Capitol looms in the background.

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Here are more complete views of the State Capitol.

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This statue depicts a naval cadet, of the late Nineteenth Century.  A woman passing by with her young daughter remarked to the child that it must have been most uncomfortable to have to wear such garb, in the heat of a Carolina summer.

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This bell tower, of First Presbyterian church, is framed by the Memorial Garden of the Harden family.

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At the opposite end of the Promenade, near the Natural Sciences Museum, is this statue depicting the naturalist Rachel Carson, listening to a story being told by a young boy.  She was passionate about educating the young, as to the dangers posed by excessive chemical use, in the mid-Twentieth Century.

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My time with the Hispanic people showed that the Tar Heel tradition continues to promote the achievements of the individual, over a mass ideological swell.  May that ethic long continue.

NEXT:  Virginia’s Eastern Shore

 

The Road to 65, Mile 186: Northwestward, Day 7- Part 1, Olympia

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I had been to the Capitol Complex, three years ago, but that was by night.  The edifice looks just as imposing in daylight.

I drove up to Washington’s capital, from Chehalis, after enjoying a vanilla latte, bowl of oatmeal, and cranberry scone for breakfast.  The last time I was in Olympia was a rush job, in between two attempts at visiting cyber-friends.  Neither was available this year, so I focused on becoming more familiar with this delightful little city, at the southern tip of Puget Sound.

I get the feeling it was trying to become more familiar with me.  I could swear the capitol dome was watching.

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The people of Washington honour their veterans as well as anyone.  This imposing sculpture spells Gratitude.

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                                           The men shown represent our troops of World War I.

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                                     The Hall of Justice evokes its counterpart in Paris.

All is not gray and staid, however.

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                                                    The Capitol grounds are well-tended.

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         A lone fir tree stands sentinel, at the east end of the grounds.

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                   On the far eastern end of the Capitol Complex, there is this inspiring poem.

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                   I sought more colour, on this rather overcast day, and found it in downtown Olympia.

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This is the old state Capitol, now the office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.  It was the Capitol until 1928.

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                           The present Capitol had its eye on me, even down at the harbour!

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                                                 There is a calm at the south end of Puget Sound.

I dropped in at Druid’s Nook, out of curiosity and picked up their last copy of Alice Walker’s “Hard Times Require Furious Dancing”.  The proprietor and I agreed that people can come up with some very strange notions.  Ms. Walker would probably concur, as well.

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                                      This is an eclectic supernatural and spiritual shop.

I spotted this spoof of “Hot Tub Time Machine”, while on the way to lunch.  Hot fudge was indeed a fun part of my childhood.

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Lunch, however, had to be more substantial, sooo:

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                                                                           Cafe Love, it was.

This little safe haven offers paninis, all manner of espresso and lattes, and vegan cupcakes.  The Northwest is downright Texan, when it comes to cupcakes.  It seems I’ve spotted them on every other corner, In Portland and in Olympia.

I did not stop in Seattle.  It was beginning rush hour, when I passed the exit to Pike Place, and I wanted to take in at least one of the public gardens in the north Puget city of Everett.  Legion Park, and Everett’s north waterfront, will take up the next post, along with the border town of Blaine.